Tuesday, October 10, 2006

On the Necessity of Taking a Break from Blogging

My good friend Whiskey Mike has a diatribe against blogs and automobiles. He seems to think that blogs allow one to say things one would not say in person. He calls for the abolition of blogs. I propose an alternate solution. Let us abolish "the natural respect people have for one another when face to face." Of course, I take "respect" to mean the hesitancy to offend by questioning someone's overly-cherished opinion.

Whiskey is right, of course (how could Whiskey be wrong?): blogging is not the same as life. Witness the gap in my blogs - life intervened. What exactly? I'm not telling you, O Reader. That's private and you're not privy. Get used to it.

Whiskey is wrong, though (I'm not sure how it happens, but I know that it does): abolishing techne (I refuse to replace the thing with the study of the thing) will not solve the fundamental problem. People can lack personality even without cars or computers as an excuse. Some people are just duds by nature.

What's the solution? They need something to enter into them from the outside: education, the Holy Ghost, or (you guessed it) whiskey!

8 comments:

iessica said...

I'm sure the Holy Ghost would appreciate being compared to whiskey...but then, both *are* spirits...

Whiskey said...

I also advocate sleeping outside and talking with bears.

Hansonius said...

Advocate, sure. Practice? I don't think so. Nemo dat quod non habet. Stick with the whiskey, Whiskey Mike.

mccaleb said...

The sleeping outside is fine...the talking with bears, however...

well, I'm a firm believer in talking to animals; they're good listeners and they never tell a soul what you tell 'em. Nor will I deny that I often prattle merrily to my household critters as I go about whatever critter-related business with which I may be occupied.

Here's the rub, though: none of my 'household critters' are of such a sort as to desire me for dinner. The budgies, it is true, nibble at my fingers when they are within reach, but I attribute it less to a carnivorous fervor than to a profound irritation at my disturbance of their ritual squawking. The point being this: I confess that I'm a bit more reticent to communicate to creatures who would as soon eat me as listen to my discourse. Not only does it reflect rather badly upon my discourse, but it poses rather personal problems as well.

Plus, any talk of talk with bears reminds me of that poor, foolish what's his name (Timmy? Tommy? -Somthing?) who ran off to make friends with the bears and got himself eaten.

At this point even I am beginning to wonder why I am blathering on about this so I will leave. Call it fall break, call it reading Chesterton...

...just don't call it whiskey.

Emma-O said...

It's an interesting idea. I just actually had a long discussion with my father a few weeks ago about what internet has done to a portion of my generational kin. Halo 2 headsets has made it possible for people to virtually never have to leave their den of Cheetos and Linkin Park again, and along with that isolation comes an unholy lack of social skills. But then again, those people probably would have been doing the same thing with D&D in the 80's, so I guess it's not a big change.

Hansonius said...

Could you be more wrong? The answer is ...Yes. D&D requires imagination and social interaction; D&D is not as bad as video games, you historical relativist.

NB: I never played D&D. My friends were too wrapped up in Nintendo. Alack.

Emma-O said...

Yet, D&D is perhaps more often related to complete social ineptinessness. While leveling up your magical hobbit with the White Ball O' Light obtained from your Wizard friend's madd rolling skillz might take more mental power than idly pressing the A Button to dodge Bowser's fireballs, people can wear tee-shirts in public that say '1-UP' with a Mario mushroom on them without having their face introduced to the inside of a toliet bowl. D&D peeps are hunted down as ruthlessly as the mythical unicorn in teenage circles.

Hansonius said...

Ignoring the fact that you know an awful lot about D&D and how to get one's face into a toilet bowl, I'll only point out that not getting beaten up for doing something isn't much of an argument for anything. I mean, cellists aren't an endangered species and there isn't exactly a run on the cello market.